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Embroidery ~ Raised Chain Band

A horizontal row of single stitches line up one after the other.


A regular row of stitches. You can do them in many color variations. This example has 2 colors, but you can add more color either with variegated floss, or perhaps putting two different colored strands on the needle.


A filled area stitch. Horizontal bands are wider such that several line of stitches can be made. If you do this, make sure the horizontal stitches are not too loose. Don’t pull too hard on the chain stitches as you make them or you will distort the horizontal stitches. Also, if you are filling an area more than an inch or so in width, make more horizontal bands across the width. Be sure to overlap them a bit, so you don’t get strange breaks when you make the rows down.


Single stitches with different widths for the horizontal stitches, or try them lined up evenly with a small space between.


This is a comparison with the horizontal bands close together and farther apart.


Curves and circles are no problem. Just make sure to space the band stitches closer on the inside of the curve and a bit wider on the outside, like spokes.


Here you see a comparison of wide and narrow horizontal stitches.

Embroidery ~ Raised Chain Band

  1. A horizontal row of single stitches line up one after the other.
  2. A regular row of stitches. You can do them in many color variations. This example has 2 colors, but you can add more color either with variegated floss, or perhaps putting two different colored strands on the needle.
  3. A filled area stitch. Horizontal bands are wider such that several line of stitches can be made. If you do this, make sure the horizontal stitches are not too loose. Don’t pull too hard on the chain stitches as you make them or you will distort the horizontal stitches. Also, if you are filling an area more than an inch or so in width, make more horizontal bands across the width. Be sure to overlap them a bit, so you don’t get strange breaks when you make the rows down.
  4. Single stitches with different widths for the horizontal stitches, or try them lined up evenly with a small space between.
  5. This is a comparison with the horizontal bands close together and farther apart.
  6. Curves and circles are no problem. Just make sure to space the band stitches closer on the inside of the curve and a bit wider on the outside, like spokes.
  7. Here you see a comparison of wide and narrow horizontal stitches.

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Embroidery ~ Burden Stitch via
Basic Stitch ~ 1st make rows of horizontal bars. Then make straight stitches going over the horizontal lines going across.  The stitch is started at the top of the lower horizontal bar and extends all the way up to the bottom of the next higher bar. Continue filling in the space with the straight stitches over the horizontal bars.  Note that the colors can be changed to give contrast or add shading.  They can be varied across the rows too!
1. The first variation, is the length of the vertical stitches. They can be placed so that the horizontal bars end up completely covered if the stitches are placed so that go over two horizontal bars instead. Fill in the area. At the top, you can make half stitches so there is a nice, finished edge.  (You can do this at the bottom too).
2. Try spacing out the stitches some.  They can be very close, or spaced out a bit, depending on how much fabric and horizontal stitching you want to show through.
3. The vertical stitches can be made double.  This allows for more of the horizontal bars to show.  Note that you can have differing thread thicknesses for the horizontal and vertical stitches.
4. The horizontal bars can vary in color too.
5. Use some metallic thread for a bit of glitter!
6. Fill in other shapes too.  The diamond shape is well suited, but round shapes can work too, just alter each stitch’s starting point as you move down the curve.

Embroidery ~ Burden Stitch via

Basic Stitch ~ 1st make rows of horizontal bars. Then make straight stitches going over the horizontal lines going across.  The stitch is started at the top of the lower horizontal bar and extends all the way up to the bottom of the next higher bar. Continue filling in the space with the straight stitches over the horizontal bars.  Note that the colors can be changed to give contrast or add shading.  They can be varied across the rows too!

1. The first variation, is the length of the vertical stitches. They can be placed so that the horizontal bars end up completely covered if the stitches are placed so that go over two horizontal bars instead. Fill in the area. At the top, you can make half stitches so there is a nice, finished edge.  (You can do this at the bottom too).

2. Try spacing out the stitches some.  They can be very close, or spaced out a bit, depending on how much fabric and horizontal stitching you want to show through.

3. The vertical stitches can be made double.  This allows for more of the horizontal bars to show.  Note that you can have differing thread thicknesses for the horizontal and vertical stitches.

4. The horizontal bars can vary in color too.

5. Use some metallic thread for a bit of glitter!

6. Fill in other shapes too.  The diamond shape is well suited, but round shapes can work too, just alter each stitch’s starting point as you move down the curve.

5 notes

Embroidery ~ Fly Stitch via
1. Who says the fly stitch can’t be a filling stitch? Line them up in horizontal rows and there you go.  Switch colors and add some shading along the way.2. Line them up vertically. As you seen in my sampler, they become larger as I went down. This wasn’t done purposefully, but it’s good anyways, shows how you can vary the size a bit.3. Again, they can be a filling stitch, this time scattered about at random angles.4. This is one of the primary ways of forming the fly stitch, the stitches are stacked up vertically with no space in between. You can start out with a small straight stitch at the top.

Embroidery ~ Fly Stitch via

1. Who says the fly stitch can’t be a filling stitch? Line them up in horizontal rows and there you go.  Switch colors and add some shading along the way.

2. Line them up vertically. As you seen in my sampler, they become larger as I went down. This wasn’t done purposefully, but it’s good anyways, shows how you can vary the size a bit.

3. Again, they can be a filling stitch, this time scattered about at random angles.

4. This is one of the primary ways of forming the fly stitch, the stitches are stacked up vertically with no space in between. You can start out with a small straight stitch at the top.

6 notes

Embroidery ~ Spider Web stitch via
1. and 2. This shows the basic stitch. You can change colors as you go along, or perhaps use threads of different thickness for the spokes and wrapping stitch. Also, you can make how many spokes you like, even or odd.3. You don’t have to fill up all the spikes. It can be quite effective with the spokes partially filled.4. The spider web stitch can be used to fill different kinds of irregular areas too. First make your spokes or bars. Then wrap the threads around them as before. You can bring the thread down at the end of the row, then up again in position for the next row.

Embroidery ~ Spider Web stitch via

1. and 2. This shows the basic stitch. You can change colors as you go along, or perhaps use threads of different thickness for the spokes and wrapping stitch. Also, you can make how many spokes you like, even or odd.

3. You don’t have to fill up all the spikes. It can be quite effective with the spokes partially filled.

4. The spider web stitch can be used to fill different kinds of irregular areas too. First make your spokes or bars. Then wrap the threads around them as before. You can bring the thread down at the end of the row, then up again in position for the next row.

3 notes

Embroidery - Sheaf Stitch via
1. Small row of “normal” stitches.2. Added contrast by wrapping the straight stitches with a different color thread.3. Use 2, 3, and 4 straight stitches.4. Vary the number of times the straight stitches are wrapped ~ 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5.5. Alternating horizontal & vertical straight stitches with the straight stitches a bit wider apart.6. Extend the wrap if decide to. Instead of pushing the first straight stitch over a little, bring the needle up just on the side of the straight stitch. Wrap under & bring the needle down in line with the final straight stitch.7. The stitches can be lined up top to bottom for an interesting border or a great fill-in.8. Irregular sheaf stitches. In some the straight stitches are place at varying distances from one another. Also the length of the individual straight stitches can be varied.9. Add a bead to the wrap stitch. The bead is passed through two times - once before wrapping under the straight stitches and again after.

Embroidery - Sheaf Stitch via

1. Small row of “normal” stitches.
2. Added contrast by wrapping the straight stitches with a different color thread.
3. Use 2, 3, and 4 straight stitches.
4. Vary the number of times the straight stitches are wrapped ~ 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5.
5. Alternating horizontal & vertical straight stitches with the straight stitches a bit wider apart.
6. Extend the wrap if decide to. Instead of pushing the first straight stitch over a little, bring the needle up just on the side of the straight stitch. Wrap under & bring the needle down in line with the final straight stitch.
7. The stitches can be lined up top to bottom for an interesting border or a great fill-in.
8. Irregular sheaf stitches. In some the straight stitches are place at varying distances from one another. Also the length of the individual straight stitches can be varied.
9. Add a bead to the wrap stitch. The bead is passed through two times - once before wrapping under the straight stitches and again after.

7 notes

Embroidery ~ Cretan stitch
1. The basic stitch with evenly spaced stitches.
2. Line up rows of stitches in different ways to create interesting patterns. This example has the rows meeting at the verticle points.
3. Well-suited to being layered. Use a different thread color or type for extra interest, or make the rows of stitches different sizes, either horizontally and vertically.
4 and 5. Varing the horizontal distance between the stitches. Variation 5 shows the Cretan stitch with no spacing. This makes for an excellent fill-in stitch with some interesting texture. This variation is also known as closed cretan stitch. Try varying the length of the vertical stitch to push together or lengthen the threads that lie on top of the stitches.
6.The verticle part of the stitches does not all have to be placed at the same heights. Vary them regularly or try an irregular pattern of stitches.

7. The cretan stitch lends itself well to be wrapped and whipped in different ways. Here are show two ways to wrap the stitches.
8.For some extra sparkle, add a bead to the cretan stitch. Here the bead is added after each vertical stitch is made.

Embroidery ~ Cretan stitch

1. The basic stitch with evenly spaced stitches.
2. Line up rows of stitches in different ways to create interesting patterns. This example has the rows meeting at the verticle points.
3. Well-suited to being layered. Use a different thread color or type for extra interest, or make the rows of stitches different sizes, either horizontally and vertically.
4 and 5. Varing the horizontal distance between the stitches. Variation 5 shows the Cretan stitch with no spacing. This makes for an excellent fill-in stitch with some interesting texture. This variation is also known as closed cretan stitch. Try varying the length of the vertical stitch to push together or lengthen the threads that lie on top of the stitches.
6.The verticle part of the stitches does not all have to be placed at the same heights. Vary them regularly or try an irregular pattern of stitches.
7. The cretan stitch lends itself well to be wrapped and whipped in different ways. Here are show two ways to wrap the stitches.
8.For some extra sparkle, add a bead to the cretan stitch. Here the bead is added after each vertical stitch is made.

9 notes

Embroidery ~ Queen Stitch via
1. An example of the standard stitch formed.2. Addition of more color is just one idea. There are many possibilities for arranging the individual stitches. Here they are lined up on their sides.3. The queen stitch can be a filling stitch also. If you don’t want a zig-zag edge, try making some half stitches to fill in the gaps.4. Different examples of aligning the queen stitch. You can make your stitches wider or narrower by changing the width of the center straight stitch. For a wider stitch, just make the middle straight stitch wider.5. This is an example with 3 colors. Each of the colors has its own needle.  Handling all those needles can be a challenge a serious challenge in itself!6. The queen stitch is well-suited to beading. In this example, a bead is added to the middle straight stitch.7. In this example a thread is whipped around the middle straight stitch. There are many other possibilities for wrapping and threading the stitches.8. Another possible alignment of stitches. Lining up two rows can make an interesting line of stitches. via

Embroidery ~ Queen Stitch via

1. An example of the standard stitch formed.
2. Addition of more color is just one idea. There are many possibilities for arranging the individual stitches. Here they are lined up on their sides.
3. The queen stitch can be a filling stitch also. If you don’t want a zig-zag edge, try making some half stitches to fill in the gaps.
4. Different examples of aligning the queen stitch. You can make your stitches wider or narrower by changing the width of the center straight stitch. For a wider stitch, just make the middle straight stitch wider.
5. This is an example with 3 colors. Each of the colors has its own needle.  Handling all those needles can be a challenge a serious challenge in itself!
6. The queen stitch is well-suited to beading. In this example, a bead is added to the middle straight stitch.
7. In this example a thread is whipped around the middle straight stitch. There are many other possibilities for wrapping and threading the stitches.
8. Another possible alignment of stitches. Lining up two rows can make an interesting line of stitches. via