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Embroidery ~ Raised Chain Band

A horizontal row of single stitches line up one after the other.


A regular row of stitches. You can do them in many color variations. This example has 2 colors, but you can add more color either with variegated floss, or perhaps putting two different colored strands on the needle.


A filled area stitch. Horizontal bands are wider such that several line of stitches can be made. If you do this, make sure the horizontal stitches are not too loose. Don’t pull too hard on the chain stitches as you make them or you will distort the horizontal stitches. Also, if you are filling an area more than an inch or so in width, make more horizontal bands across the width. Be sure to overlap them a bit, so you don’t get strange breaks when you make the rows down.


Single stitches with different widths for the horizontal stitches, or try them lined up evenly with a small space between.


This is a comparison with the horizontal bands close together and farther apart.


Curves and circles are no problem. Just make sure to space the band stitches closer on the inside of the curve and a bit wider on the outside, like spokes.


Here you see a comparison of wide and narrow horizontal stitches.

Embroidery ~ Raised Chain Band

  1. A horizontal row of single stitches line up one after the other.
  2. A regular row of stitches. You can do them in many color variations. This example has 2 colors, but you can add more color either with variegated floss, or perhaps putting two different colored strands on the needle.
  3. A filled area stitch. Horizontal bands are wider such that several line of stitches can be made. If you do this, make sure the horizontal stitches are not too loose. Don’t pull too hard on the chain stitches as you make them or you will distort the horizontal stitches. Also, if you are filling an area more than an inch or so in width, make more horizontal bands across the width. Be sure to overlap them a bit, so you don’t get strange breaks when you make the rows down.
  4. Single stitches with different widths for the horizontal stitches, or try them lined up evenly with a small space between.
  5. This is a comparison with the horizontal bands close together and farther apart.
  6. Curves and circles are no problem. Just make sure to space the band stitches closer on the inside of the curve and a bit wider on the outside, like spokes.
  7. Here you see a comparison of wide and narrow horizontal stitches.

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Embroidery ~ Burden Stitch via
Basic Stitch ~ 1st make rows of horizontal bars. Then make straight stitches going over the horizontal lines going across.  The stitch is started at the top of the lower horizontal bar and extends all the way up to the bottom of the next higher bar. Continue filling in the space with the straight stitches over the horizontal bars.  Note that the colors can be changed to give contrast or add shading.  They can be varied across the rows too!
1. The first variation, is the length of the vertical stitches. They can be placed so that the horizontal bars end up completely covered if the stitches are placed so that go over two horizontal bars instead. Fill in the area. At the top, you can make half stitches so there is a nice, finished edge.  (You can do this at the bottom too).
2. Try spacing out the stitches some.  They can be very close, or spaced out a bit, depending on how much fabric and horizontal stitching you want to show through.
3. The vertical stitches can be made double.  This allows for more of the horizontal bars to show.  Note that you can have differing thread thicknesses for the horizontal and vertical stitches.
4. The horizontal bars can vary in color too.
5. Use some metallic thread for a bit of glitter!
6. Fill in other shapes too.  The diamond shape is well suited, but round shapes can work too, just alter each stitch’s starting point as you move down the curve.

Embroidery ~ Burden Stitch via

Basic Stitch ~ 1st make rows of horizontal bars. Then make straight stitches going over the horizontal lines going across.  The stitch is started at the top of the lower horizontal bar and extends all the way up to the bottom of the next higher bar. Continue filling in the space with the straight stitches over the horizontal bars.  Note that the colors can be changed to give contrast or add shading.  They can be varied across the rows too!

1. The first variation, is the length of the vertical stitches. They can be placed so that the horizontal bars end up completely covered if the stitches are placed so that go over two horizontal bars instead. Fill in the area. At the top, you can make half stitches so there is a nice, finished edge.  (You can do this at the bottom too).

2. Try spacing out the stitches some.  They can be very close, or spaced out a bit, depending on how much fabric and horizontal stitching you want to show through.

3. The vertical stitches can be made double.  This allows for more of the horizontal bars to show.  Note that you can have differing thread thicknesses for the horizontal and vertical stitches.

4. The horizontal bars can vary in color too.

5. Use some metallic thread for a bit of glitter!

6. Fill in other shapes too.  The diamond shape is well suited, but round shapes can work too, just alter each stitch’s starting point as you move down the curve.

5 notes

Embroidery ~ Fly Stitch via
1. Who says the fly stitch can’t be a filling stitch? Line them up in horizontal rows and there you go.  Switch colors and add some shading along the way.2. Line them up vertically. As you seen in my sampler, they become larger as I went down. This wasn’t done purposefully, but it’s good anyways, shows how you can vary the size a bit.3. Again, they can be a filling stitch, this time scattered about at random angles.4. This is one of the primary ways of forming the fly stitch, the stitches are stacked up vertically with no space in between. You can start out with a small straight stitch at the top.

Embroidery ~ Fly Stitch via

1. Who says the fly stitch can’t be a filling stitch? Line them up in horizontal rows and there you go.  Switch colors and add some shading along the way.

2. Line them up vertically. As you seen in my sampler, they become larger as I went down. This wasn’t done purposefully, but it’s good anyways, shows how you can vary the size a bit.

3. Again, they can be a filling stitch, this time scattered about at random angles.

4. This is one of the primary ways of forming the fly stitch, the stitches are stacked up vertically with no space in between. You can start out with a small straight stitch at the top.